Writer: Jamil Zainasheff

Dunkelweizen

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Jamil Zainasheff provides BYO readers with a recipe for a classic dunkelweizen.


Northern English Brown

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Jamil Zainasheff provides readers with a recipe for a Northern English-styled brown ale. Northern brown ales tend to be a bit less roasty, drier, and a bit more hop character.


American Rye

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If you’re looking for a well-balanced American rye, you’re in luck. Recipe provided by Jamil Zainasheff.


American Wheat

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If you’re looking for a well-balanced American wheat, you’re in luck. Recipe provided by Jamil Zainasheff.


Uncommon Common – California Common

FREE

Anchor Brewing Company has always been very generous to homebrewers. This recipe by Jamil Zainasheff makes a beer similar in flavor to Anchor Steam, but a bit bigger in mouthfeel, hops and malt flavors. If you want a beer a bit drier and more like Anchor Steam, eliminate the Munich, Victory and pale chocolate malts.


Harold-is-Weizen (German Hefeweizen)

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Jamil Zainasheff provides BYO readers with a recipe for a classic German-style hefeweizen.


Traditional Bock

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by the numbers OG:1.064–1.072 (15.7–17.5 °P) FG:1.013–1.019 (3.3–4.8 °P) SRM:14–22 IBU:20–27 ABV:6.3–7.2% I have never been to the German city of Einbeck. It is not a common tourist destination, but I am still more than a little surprised I have never been there. From what I have heard, it has a lot to offer —


Shake It Up With A Little Salt: The ancient German style of Gose

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I know it was more than a decade ago when I first heard of Gose (pronounced goes-uh), a 1,000-year-old German beer style made with wheat, coriander and salt. I do not remember who first told me about it, but a good guess would be Randy Mosher or Ray Daniels. Both are always pulling odd historical


Belgian Dubbel

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by the numbers OG:1.062–1.075 (15.2–18.2 °P) FG:1.008–1.018 (2.0–4.6 °P) SRM: 10–17 IBU:15–25 ABV:6–7.6% I fondly remember my very first trip to Belgium. I was already passionate about homebrewing and great beer, and I wandered from city to city, brewery to brewery, bar to bar, and bottle shop to bottle shop seeking out new experiences and


Oktoberfest

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by the numbersOG:1.050–1.056 (12.4–13.8 °P) FG:1.012–1.016 (3.1–4.1 °P) SRM: 7–14 IBU:20–28 ABV:4.8–5.7% People often ask me, “What is your favorite style?” I tell them that I love all of the styles, because they are all great beers. Picking a favorite style for me would be like picking a favorite child. Well, almost. There are some


Bière de Garde

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by the numbers OG:1.060–1.080 (14.7–19.3 °P) FG:1.008–1.016 (2–4.1 °P) SRM:6–19 IBU:18–28 ABV:6–8.5% It was well over a decade ago and I was still perfecting my brewing of the entire Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) style guide. My process was to read everything about a style, drink as many commercial and homebrew samples as I could


Specialty IPAs

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by the numbers OG, FG, SRM, IBU, ABV will vary. The BJCP is currently considering three strength categories: Session:3.0–5.0 ABV Standard:5.0–7.5% ABV Double:7.5–9.5% ABV When I started brewing, there was only one style category for India pale ale. Just a single category, no subcategories. Several years later, people had begun talking about the differences between


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