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Throughout history brewers have probably utilized every type of vessel they could get their hands on to ferment their brew. From sheepskins, clay pots, glass, enamel, and everything between. The English had

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The Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) training material outlines a sensory training process for brewers and clubs using ingredients found around the home or the brewery. As Education Chair for the Aurora

Recipe

New Realm Brewing Co.’s Radegast Triple IPA clone (5 gallons/19 L, all-grain)OG = 1.098  FG = 1.009IBU = 100+  SRM = 5  ABV = 11.5% Named after the Czech god of hospitality, Mitch Steele’s

Recipe

Raspberry Gose (5 gallons/19 L, all-grain)OG = 1.046  FG = 1.009IBU = 0  SRM = 3  ABV = 4.7% The OG is prior to souring. The FG and ABV include the impact

Article

Updated August 12, 2020 Homebrew News Virtual Hop Harvest The 2020 Yakima Chief Hops (YCH) Virtual Hop Harvest is a month-long, online event available for free and to the public, bringing beer

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3 Ways to Wheat

  It’s easy to spot the wheat beer among the ambers and stouts on any taproom table: just look for the one with the soft, hazy glow in the palest shade of

Article

Matt Dick, the Founder of Boundary Brewing in Belfast, was one of the first brewers to sit for a Beer Judge Certification exam in Ireland in 2013. Since then, he and others

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There’s a persistent and mythical justification that revolves around homebrewing that I’m sure most of us have presented to our significant others, families, or ourselves at various points in our brewing career,

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Beat the Heat

Hot summer temperatures can make chilling and fermenting more difficult, but with these techniques you won’t need to sweat it when things heat up.

Project

A typical ten-gallon (38-L) batch may expel as much as two gallons (7.6 L) of moisture into the surrounding atmosphere during the boil . . .

Article

Using crystal malt to add flavor and color to beer.

Article

Proteins from grains react with polyphenols from grain and hops, and when this happens the protein-polyphenol complex causes light to scatter and the beer to appear hazy.

Troubleshooting

Ask Mr. Wizard

I can’t seem to find any information that I feel like I can trust on the amount of priming sugar to use if I cold crash my homebrew. I have heard you need less priming sugar, but the calculations I’ve seen haven’t been reliable. Also some say not to worry and it might take a little longer to carbonate. This is probably the most confusing thing I have tried to get info on in almost two years of homebrewing. I don’t keg yet, which really makes it worse because it seems like most people offering knowledge do. I’m just scared of getting bottle bombs or 48 flat beers.

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

Welcome to the Brew Your Own Community

Hi! I'm Brad, Publisher of Brew Your Own. Our mission is to deliver well-researched homebrewing information in a clear way to help people pursue their passion for making great beer at home. We try to be informative without being intimidating. This is, after all, a hobby not a job. So, we give you scientifically-sound information in an entertaining format that never loses sight of the how-to mission we have. We want to give you the skills to craft great beer at home. That's why we not only publish proven recipes, but we also write about common brewing problems (Ask Mr. Wizard) and provide you with information, tips, DIY projects, and techniques so you can make your own world-class beer. For over two decades Brew Your Own magazine has earned the respect of homebrewers worldwide with our mix of how-to content in the hobby's largest paid circulation publication. Digital members now have access to thousands of these tested and reviewed recipes, techniques, and projects and complete access to recent and current issues of Brew Your Own magazine as well as our Special Issue library. The majority of this updated homebrewing content is being released digitally here for the first time to our digital members. I don't think you'll find homebrewing content of this quality and authority anywhere else online. We'd love to have you join us as a member!

Cheers, Brad Ring
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