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Using Hop Extracts

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Hops contain hundreds of components including alpha and beta acids, hydrocarbons, thiols, tannins, enzymes, terpenes, and glycosides. The exact compounds and amounts differ depending on variety and growing conditions. Even with ideal storage (cold and low-oxygen), the ratios shift over time. Some processors isolate and concentrate specific hop compounds so that each can be added

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Controlling Diacetyl

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When yeast ferments beer, it produces more than 500 different compounds. Many of these compounds give beer its characteristic flavor and aroma. One of these compounds — one that is usually considered undesirable — is diacetyl. Diacetyl gives a buttery, butterscotch-like flavor to beer and is influenced by fermentation temperature, aeration level, bacterial contamination, and

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Making Hard Seltzers at Home

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Hard seltzers are everywhere and you can also make your own hard seltzers at home flavored just the way you want. But making it is a bit different from brewing beer since you are essentially fermenting sugar water. So you’ll need to get tips and advice on using yeast nutrients to get the job done.

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Making Kettle Sours at Home

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Kettle souring has grown in popularity recently because it speeds up the timeline for making sour beers. But there are several different ways to kettle sour with different sour cultures and even yeasts that create a faster sour beer. Brew Your Own’s Technical Editor Ashton Lewis walks you through the different options you have at

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Carbonating a Corny Homebrew Keg

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There is something special when you can enjoy your homebrew served from a keg. But how do you properly dial in the keg carbonation levels and what are your carbonating options when using a keg to package your homebrew? Brew Your Own’s Technical Editor Ashton Lewis will show you the three most common ways to

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Using a Water Bath for Temperature Control

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Controlling temperature is a key part of producing better beer. Whether it is keeping your fermenting beer in the proper temperature range for the yeast strain you’ve chosen or for extended lagering techniques, being able to accurately dial in temperature will result in a higher quality beer without risking off-flavors, off-aromas, and incomplete fermentation if

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Making a Yeast Starter from Plates or Slants

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Learn how to start with a single colony of yeast stored on a plate or slant and build it up to a pitchable quality to add to your wort for your beer fermentation. Brew Your Own’s Technical Editor Ashton Lewis walks you through step-by-step how to take the colony from the plate or slant and

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Beer Foam Building Tips

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Brew Your Own’s Technical Editor and Mr. Wizard Columnist Ashton Lewis really, really loves beer foam. In fact he wrote his Master’s thesis while at UC-Davis’ brewing program all about beer foam. So now Ashton will break down the keys to having better foam in your glass. He’ll cover how to boost your chances at

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Streaking Yeast on a Plate

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Yeast is everywhere, on plants, on fruit, in the air…and in beer. Streaking an agar plate is a quick and easy way to isolate yeast, to check for purity, and to re-culture yeast from sources like a bottle-conditioned beer or your own fermenter. A sterile inoculation loop is dipped into a sample of yeast and

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Making Your Own Agar Plates at Home

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Agar Plates can be used to streak and isolate yeast strains for your brewing. Instead of buying these agar plates, Brew Your Own Magazine’s Technical Editor Ashton Lewis shows you how to easily and cost-effectively make your own agar plates at home. From preparing the agar medium to pouring the plates, Ashton walks you through

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Better Hydrometer Readings on Carbonated Beer

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Getting accurate hydrometer readings is critically important to brewing better beer. However sometimes it’s really tough to get the best reading you can – especially after your beer has some carbonation built up after fermentation. All that foam in your hydrometer cylinder isn’t going to help you get accurate numbers not to mention even seeing

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Beer Yeast Cell Counts with Microscope and Hemocytometer

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If you know the viability of the yeast you are pitching into your wort you can be more confident your fermentation will go as expected. One of the most popular ways brewers understand how many cells they are pitching is to use a microscope and a special slide called a hemocytometer to count yeast cells.

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36 result(s) found.