January-February 2009

Recipe

Recipe

Hook Norton Brewery’s Double Stout clone

FREE

The “double stout” in this beer’s name is not indicative of a strong beer. Actually, it’s quite low in gravity and makes a particularly good session pint. What the double means to me is that this beer literally has double the flavor of other low gravity stouts. East Kent Goldings hops lend a spicy character to the nose which blends in perfectly well with its rich, thick toasty body. The deep roast edges finish into a crisp dryness that ensures this beer’s utter drinkability. You better get this beer fast because it’s only seasonally available.

Recipe

Recipe

Avant Garde American Pale Ale

FREE

This beer won a gold medal in the first round of the 2008 NHC competition. Recipe written by Gordon Strong.

Recipe

Recipe

Classic American Pale Ale

FREE

Gordan Strong provides an all-grain version and extract with grains version of his first American Pale Ale recipe. It won gold medals in five different competitions.

Mr. Wizard

Mr. Wizard

Using spices

FREE

The Wiz remembers saying sayonara to a cinnamon beer.

Recipe

Recipe

Founders Brewing Co.’s Breakfast Stout clone

FREE

Founder’s describes this as “the coffee lover’s consummate beer.” Brewed with flaked oats, bitter and imported chocolate, and two types of coffee, this is indeed like the strong, dark cup of joe you’ll want for breakfast—or anytime!

Article

Article

Ferment in a Cornelius Keg

FREE

For those of you that keg your homebrew, chances are you’ve got at least one Cornelius keg sitting empty at any given time. Why not put them to good use as primary and/or secondary fermenters? And for those that don’t keg but are considering it in the future, picking up a keg or two for fermenting is a great way to start building up the equipment you’ll need for a kegerator. Used Cornelius kegs cost about $30 to $40, and with about $10 more in fittings and tubing you can have a 5-gallon (19-L) stainless steel fermenting vessel. The advantages of using a keg are that it’s light-tight, has built-in handles for easy transport and if you have a kegerator you can use your CO2 system to rack the beer in a completely closed environment with no siphoning.

 

Article

Article

Hop Polyphenols

FREE

What are hop polyphenols, and how do they affect bitterness in dry hopped beers?

Article

Article

Choosing Hop Varieties

FREE

There are many ingredients that brewers use to flavor and season their beer, from orange peel and coriander to black pepper and grains of paradise. But the gold standard remains the humble hop. Hops have long served many purposes in beer. They provide bitterness to balance the sweetness of malt, and add myriad flavors and aromas. When choosing which hop or combination of hops to include in a particular beer there are several questions that come to mind. What type and degree of bitterness, flavor and aroma is desired in the beer to be brewed? How are the bitterness, flavor and aroma derived from hops? What style of beer is being brewed, or am I leaving style guidelines behind to create something of my own?

 

Article

Article

Brewing American Pale Ale

FREE

What does it take to turn an average American pale ale into an awesome one? Guest columnist Gordon Strong explains the style.

 

Mr. Wizard

Mr. Wizard

Single malts

FREE

The Wiz has just one thing to say about single-malt Pilsner.

Article

Article

Fermenting Big Belgian-style Beers: Tips from the Pros

FREE

What’s the difference between fermenting everyday beers and fermenting the big, strong Belgians? The yeast of course. These three professional Belgian-style brewers talk about what it takes to keep your yeast happy, healthy and productive, even in the most extreme conditions.

Article

Article

Brown Malt

FREE

It has been known as blown, porter and snap malt, but homebrewers know it as brown malt, if they know it at all. Its mellow roast character, cheeky bitterness and acrid finish has warmed the cockles of many an Englishman over the centuries. It was once a malt of choice for many dark brews, especially porters and stouts. However, improvements in malting technology — including the development of pale base malts with better yields and dark specialty malts with more color — led to its decline. And it almost faded into brewing history. Almost. Today, a few maltsters — including Crisp, Thomas Fawcett and Sons, Hugh Baird and Beeston — produce brown malt and many homebrewers are discovering what made this lightly-roasted malt so popular in the past. Brown malt is back.

Article

Article

Brewing Big Barleywines

FREE

Barleywine is beer, not wine. Beyond that, the definition can get a bit fuzzy. One thing’s for sure, however, and that’s that it takes some skill to brew a good one. Learn how to handle all that malt and get the proper amount of attenuation in your own barleywine. Plus: three big recipes.

Article

Article

Award-Winning Homebrew Recipes

FREE

Homebrewers love recipes, especially those that have had success at homebrew competitions. With that in mind, BYO decided it was time to gather some best of show winning recipes and present them to our readers.

 

Article

Article

20 Tips for New Brewers

FREE

We ask retail shops for tips to help new brewers improve their beers and brewing process. From cleaning to ingredient choice to techniques, we have the tips from folks who deal with new brewers every day.