Writer: Chris Colby

141 result(s) found.

What is Brewing?

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Brewing is the process of making beer — a fermented, alcoholic beverage made from grains. The most commonly used grain for brewing is barley, but there are others (including wheat, rye, oats

Counter-Pressure Bottling

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The main challenges of counter-pressure bottling are to retain the beer’s carbonation and minimize its exposure to oxygen during the transfer. When performed correctly, almost all of a beer’s carbonation is retained when it is counter-pressure bottled. Likewise, with a little practice, the beer can be transferred with minimal exposure to oxygen. Learn how with pointers found here.

Decoction Mashing

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Almost all modern malts are well modified and respond well to a single infusion mash when an all-malt beer is being brewed. But sometimes you will come across a malt or recipe

Making the Most of Your Mash

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Refine your mashing variables and fine tune your technique.

Your First All-Grain Beer

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Brew a homebrew with malted grains from start to finish.

Calculating IBUs

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In alcoholic beverages, maltiness is usually balanced by another flavor. In wine (and some styles of beer), maltiness is balanced by acidity. In most styles of beer, maltiness is balanced by the

Buying & Storing Hops

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There are many different varieties of hops available to the homebrewer. In addition, these hops come in a few different forms. Different forms of hops vary with regards to their storage potential

Calibration and Conclusion

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Homebrewers have a variety of tools at their disposal — including hydrometers, thermometers and pH meters — to measure important variables during the brew day. It is important that these be calibrated, so

Post Fermentation and Packaging

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After fermentation, the beer needs to be packaged into bottles or kegs. The beer must also be carbonated to the correct level. For the best results, the beer should be exposed to

Fermenting and Conditioning

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Running a healthy fermentation depends on pitching an appropriate amount of healthy yeast. Beyond that, creating proper wort conditions (with respect to aeration and nutrition) and controlling your fermentation temperatures are the

Wort Production (with malted grains)

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Making wort from malted grains gives the brewer the freedom to control the attributes of his or her wort, most notably, its fermentability. You have many options on an all-grain brew day.

Wort Production (with malt extract)

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Wort made from reconstituted malt extract is dissimilar from wort made from mashing malted grains. Knowing the differences can guide you to making sound decisions regarding how to use it on brew

141 result(s) found.